Tag Archive: design inspiration and trends

  1. Thursday Salute to Originals: Art on Wheels

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    Taxis aren’t typically regarded as a glamorous of method of travel. Usually scrunched into an outdated, stuffy, and grimy back seat, most patrons can’t wait to bolt from those yellow doors as soon as the brakes hit at their stop. But if you’re a passenger in India, on the other hand, you might just decide run that meter a little longer and take another lap around the block.

    taxi-fabric-purple-kumar-happily-ever-after

    Taxi Fabric is a design firm in Mumbai that pairs with local artists to produce fabric interiors for cab vehicles. But this multidisciplinary company doesn’t just create your run-of-the-mill interiors: boring colors, forgettable fabrics, standard design. No, Taxi Fabric completely decks out the cab interior – ceiling, seats, doors, frame – with vibrant, whimsical, and original cultural artworks.

    taxi-fabric-three-wheel-vibe-sanskar-sawant

    taxi-fabric-city-as-objects-kulavoor

    Clearly, these cab interiors have a cool and unique vibe, but they do much more than just make for an interesting commute. Taxis are a convenient form of transportation in Mumbai, where tens of thousands of cabs move millions of commuters throughout the city. Cabs bearing these crazy interiors really stand out from the rest of the pack drawing patrons, while at the same time, exposing local artists to members of the public who otherwise might not have seen their work. Furthermore, drivers of these tricked out cabs report providing longer rides and get better tips as a result  of the interior (how’s that for using art and design to spur economic growth!).

    taxi-fabric-samya-arif-monad-pink

    taxi-fabric-jungle-book-blue-amiruddin

    We love that this project combines a bunch of things that normally wouldn’t go together -public transportation, interior design, art, local advertising and promotion – and turns a cab ride from being a dreaded and mundane activity to the highlight of your day. And for that, we happily give our Thursday Original Salute. We’re keeping fingers crossed this trend catches on in the States soon. Imagine stepping off the curb to hail some local art on wheels instead of a grungy backseat!

    Image Credits: Colossal

  2. Thursday Salute to Originals: Utopian Bodies

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    When thinking about utopia, most designers will recall imagined societies and cityscapes that we learned in architectural history books. Envisioned by the likes of Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier, utopia in the architectural realm is rendered with broad strokes, at the scale of urban planning and building massing. Seldom do we pause to think about how utopian ideals can infiltrate into other industries, such as fashion, and at a scale that rests not in our urban environments, but on our bodies.

    Futuristic-Fashion-Liljevalch-Stockholm

    The Utopian Bodies exhibit at Liljevalchs Museum in Stockholm depicts the impact of fashion on the future. The showcase, which runs through February 7, 2016, features both recognizable and avant garde designers from across the globe.  Eleven galleries each present a different theme: Sustainability, Change, Technology, Craft & Form, Craft & Colour, Resistance & Society, Resistance & Beauty, Solidarity, Memory, Gender Identity and Love.  These are heavy, deep subjects – not for the faint of heart to tackle – and the garments within them are steeped in multiple meanings.

    Take a look at a sampling of fashion garments that put their own spin on utopian ideals. It’s remarkable how a piece can act as forward-thinking and nostalgic all at once.

    Utopian-Bodies-Forward-Fashion-Design Utopian-Bodies-Fashion-Exhibit Utopian-Fashion-Soft-Fabric-Design
    Utopian-Fashion-White-Wigs-Mannequins Utopian-Distorted-Fashion-Exhibit Pink-Bubbly-Fashion-Design-Futuristic
    Utilizing intelligent materials, interactivity, and playing on the scale of the human form, just browsing this visual feast inspires us to take materiality to a whole new level AND on a much more intimate scale. Salute to all those designers who challenge our deep-seated ideals!

    Image Source: Yatzer

  3. Thursday Salute to Originals: Physical Pigment Library

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    Most designers seem to instinctively gravitate towards black, white and gray (honestly, what doesn’t look good in one of these hues?). But for those of us with a passion for color – or the science behind it –  there’s a place where you can be completely surrounded by all the brilliant hues from famous artworks, antiquity, and locations around the world: the Forbes Pigment Collection at the Harvard Art Museums.

    Forbes-Pigment-Collection

    The concept, conceived over 100 years ago by Edward Forbes who became entranced with understanding the creation of color and artworks as a whole, has now grown into a collection of 2,500 different pigments. Each physical sample is separately housed in glass bottles and viles, and then categorized in an elaborate database structured on the color wheel.

    Pigment-Collection-Forbes-Colors

    Pigment-Drawers-Straus-Center-Colors

    But don’t get ahead of yourself; this isn’t some craft store with a bunch of different acrylic paints to choose from or a glorified Pantone swatch book.  The Forbes Pigment Collection is touted as a “Laboratory for the Fine Arts,” documenting, cataloguing, and preserving  physical samples of rare, iconic, extinct, and even poisonous hues known to mankind.

    One color in the library called “Indian Yellow,” was used in Georges Seurat’s pointillist paintings. However, the hue is no longer attainable as the pigment is derived from the urine of cows fed only mango leaves, and the practice has since been outlawed.  Another color, a vibrant Emerald Green used in one of Van Gogh’s self-portraits, is also housed in the collection. It is considered extremely dangerous as its fumes are highly toxic and can be potentially deadly.

    Pigment-Lead-Harvard-Color-Library

    A specimen labeled Ultra Marine is pictured from the pigment collection of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies housed inside the Harvard Art Museums at Harvard University. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

    There are even pigments from the middle ages and beyond. One piercingly intense blue made from crushed lapis lazuli stone mined from Afghanistan’s quarries was prized more than gold and utilized in medieval artworks.

    Pigment-Collection-Display-Straus-Center

    For collecting, documenting, and conserving the physical building blocks of the vast world of color, we salute Edward Forbes and the Forbes Pigment Library. We’re sure one trip into this museum would inspire even the most anti-color designer to feature some of these vibrant hues in their next creation!

    Sources: This is ColossalMark Mahaney, Harvard Gazette

  4. Thursday Salute to Originals: Pantone for Pop Culture

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    You’ve probably heard by now that the Pantone colors of the year are Rose Quartz and Serenity. These are the hues that are supposed to define and influence colors for the year. But there’s one particular pop culture icon – or family, should we say –  that will not be making wardrobe changes based on this color forecast.

    Simpsons-Pantone-Colors

    Used to seeing their colors in animated form, designer Hyo Taek Kim, decided to take characters from the beloved show, The Simpsons, and render the series and its characters in Pantone form. Taking hues symbolic to each iconic character, he assembled them into proportionate color palettes that seem to exude the essence of the character in pure color form, sans the Springfield setting.

    Homer-Simpson-Pantone-Swatch

    Simpsons-Pantone-Character-Colors

    Simpsons-Character-Pantone-Colors

    The-Simpsons-Cartoon-Pantone-Swatch

    For taking a  unique TV show and translating it into another original – and completely different – artistic medium, we salute Kim for merging color and animation. We’re only bummed we didn’t think of it first. As Homer would say, “D’oh”!

    Image credits: Fubiz.net, HypeBeast

  5. Impactful Entry Space: Clarion Hotel & Congress Trondheim

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    In this Impactful Entry Space blog series, we will feature a designer or artist that has created an attention-grabbing design for the main lobby space of a building. Drawing inspiration from completed entry spaces around the world, we travel beyond the image by diving into the design process and concepts behind it.

    Today, we feature our interview with Gary Bates of  Space Group about the lobby design of Clarion Hotel & Congress Trondheim in Oslo, Norway.

    Interior Lobby 2

    GPI Design: What did the lobby space mean to the building as a whole?

    Gary Bates: The lobby space acts as a social catalyst. It was important for us that we managed to make that “interior living room” for the city, especially with challenges such as developer driven logic’s prioritizing simplification and quantification of square meters. The whole project was generated around the lobby with all the interior spaces and public functions agglomerating around it. We were inspired by the kind of John Portmanhotelsin the United States that have these kinds of dramatic atrium spaces and it becomes this special room open and ‘free’ for the city. Especially for this location, where you have at times an imposing climate, it is a luxury to have this incredibly malleable lobby space that is first and foremost a very large covered public space.

    Lobby Walls

    GPI: What were your functional and conceptual goals for the lobby?

    Bates: In any situation, it is always good ask how a space can be both adaptive but at the same time specific. There was a period in architecture when flexible meant innocuous, a square white room.We had a very specific aesthetic in that room in mind and it was important that they could do exhibitions and large conferences. The lobby is actually split in two, there is a pinch-point in the middle and we have a conference lobby to one side and entry lobby on the other side. The restaurant and entry lobby are connected to the conference lobby and the conference facilities at the pinch-point.

    The possibility of shared space was imminent; we wanted the space to flow freely as a whole, including the flows both inside and outside, orchestrated by the natural light conditions. There had to be enough light in that central space, not as visible windows but through the ‘fissures’ of the blocks and the skylight. It is incredibly exciting to see how the occupants utilize the lobby; they have hosted events where a motorcycle drives through the lobby into the conference room, and numerous types of parties with large amounts of people. As people stand on the bridges connecting the wings of the hotel through the void of the central lobby, they can look down through the lobby space and it looks fantastic. When you create a building like that it means having creative clients and in this case, creative users as Choice for the Clarion Hotel. We tried to imagine this kind of thing but we did not imagine vocalists standing on the bridges with a completely packed lobby and music’s resonating in this cathedral like space. It was a beautiful moment. You never know that when you create something, what people are going to dream up.

    Lobby Ceiling 1

     

    Lobby Bridge

    GPI: How did you use specific design tools (such as color, form, materiality, lighting) to create the space?

    Bates: The thing with atrium hotels is that they are based so much on the verticality.  You enter the space and the repetition becomes the ornament and by the radical repetition of flow; (when you’re standing looking up 80 stories into the air as in the Grand Hyatt Shanghai), the sheer simplicity and repetition of elements and balconies becomes an aesthetic in and of itself.

    Even though we don’t really have that here and the building is not that tall, it creates that illusion, mediated by textures and light. We worked from a horizontal approach starting with a basic atrium, then we collapsed ‘plan’ so that all of the different wings of the hotel were oriented to specific views. This ‘crumpled’ lobby was pinched in the middle creating two different spaces. Then we started to cut into the volume, letting light slip in horizontally between the slabs. We have this beautiful light coming in to the atrium through these fissures,where natural lighting combined with the large skylight above created this very magical space inside.

    There is always to some degree, cladding in architecture, but with a very restrictive budget, we sought raw, robust, and meanwhile expressive materials. We have pre-fabricated concrete bridges, crossing the atrium, specific and playful. The reflections and patterns in the stone floor deconstruct the banality of grids and directions, inspiring free flow. We made these special origami inspired walls with a very intricate and delicate pattern giving the room texture and enhances the visual movements. The color palette is fairly subdued in the sense that the light reflected with white walls enhances the texture which is a special design element and creates contrast at the base with the dark floor. We work a lot with ornament, down to not just color, but texture and the treatment of the raw materials, inspired by Scandinavian design sensibility; it is interesting for me as an American working in Scandinavian to see this incredibly rough, exotic and sublime landscape.

    Lobby Ceiling

     

    Exterior Roof

    GPI: What was the biggest constraint in turning this design into a reality?

    Bates: The biggest constraint is that the building was largely over budget and when the first prices came in, we had an incredible path to try and bring it within budget. This was an incredible challenge, to come into a dialogue with the general contractors. They have their own ideas of how to do things and we had to try and find a common language to achieve the kind of results we wanted. It takes a lot of effort to find a communication platform that works for both, but as time goes on and your commitment is respected and appreciated you get more and more trust, giving opportunities to affect the design. It was really an evolution in the process from the beginning when we were not at all prioritized, or even worse, perceived as an obstacle. Trust is an incredible asset to the team as people start a design process.

    Exterior Fjord

    GPI: What makes this space impactful?

    Bates: What I think is impactful about this hotel is that it is accessible for everyone. It has that public component in our case, the lobby is connected to a sky bar, which is connected to an incredible view overlooking the fjord. I think the impactful influence is that it becomes an extension of the city.

    The interesting thing was that there was a very mixed reaction to the hotel at the beginning. It was new and people didn’t know how to approach it or what to think about it. There were a lot of critiques in the newspaper saying it was too big or that it was too foreign but at the same time it was in the middle of an industrial area that was just starting to transform. There were a lot of mixed reactions but as it became part of the city and as people started to use it, having events such as weddings, receptions, and conferences, the people began to embrace it. When you saw that excitement, the project really began to take off.

    The hotel adds value to the community and that for me is what makes it important, that the city slowly started to adapt and move toward it and enjoy the views from it and those kinds of stories are what makes it impactful. We really found an interesting common ground between having a conference hotel which is on a very strict budget with tight margins, and a strong design.  ‘Touch everything’ is one of the principles in SPACE GROUP. The Clarion Hotel is a very strong place, strong in its form and strong in its aesthetic and it is unique in that way for creating a social impact.

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    Many thanks to Gary for sharing the inspiration for this lobby design. For more visual inspiration, follow our Impactful Entry Space board on Pinterest.

    Image Credits: SPACE GROUP and photographers Ivan Brodey and Peter Hebeisen

     

  6. Thursday Salute to Originals: Musical Highways

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    We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again, we’re suckers for the details. Creating projects with strange – or seemingly impossible – engineering criteria really gets our creative wheels turning. But we also love the miniscule details where a couple millimeters really make the difference between a lackluster project and a phenomenal one. And while we’re used to engineering tight lighting cavities and unusual backlit features, there’s a curious engineering movement taking over highways that put an unsuspecting musical twist on precision and detail.

    musical-road-grooves-pavement-song

    Awhile back, a Japanese engineer made some accidental markings in a road with a bulldozer claw. Later, when he ran over the markings with his car, he realized the vibrations from the grooves created a musical melody. This accidental observation spurred further thought and research, and in 2007, engineers from the Hokkaido Industrial Research Institute precisely finessed these markings into actual musical tunes.

    musical-highway-markings-close-pavement-grooves-pattern-song

    Making a musical road is not just as simple as cutting a few channels into the pavement, though. (We know this all too well in the world of backlit surfaces, the design is NEVER as simple as it seems). The size, depth, distance between the grooves, and speed of the car all have an impact on the pitch of the vibration emitted. By varying these variables, different melodies can be designed (closer grooves = higher pitch; further spaced grooves = lower pitches; faster speed = faster song tempo, etc). But if any of these elements are off – even by a few millimeters or few mph – the song will be distorted.

    musical-road-sign-blue

    musical-highway-view-from-car-grooves-road

    Watch the clip below to hear the melody on a road in New Mexico. See if you can figure out what tune the vibrations sing.

    Utilizing precise engineering to turn highways into whimsical musical instruments is certainly deserving of our Thursday Original Salute! Now that’s what we call cruising music – literally!

    Image Credits: Amusing Planet

  7. Impactful Entry Space: Hilton Pattaya

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    In this Impactful Entry Space blog series, we will feature a designer or artist that has created an attention-grabbing design for the main lobby space of a building. Drawing inspiration from completed entry spaces around the world, we travel beyond the image by diving into the design process and concepts behind it.

    Today, we feature our interview with Thunchanok Sirichayaporn of Department of Architecture about the lobby design of Hilton Pattaya in Pattaya, Thailand.

    03 Lobby

    GPI Design: What did the lobby space mean to the building as a whole?

    Thunchanok Sirichayaporn: The space for the hotel lobby and bar occupies the 16th floor, high above the bustle of Pattaya beach below. Upon entering the space from one end, as elevator doors open, one would enter a spacious lobby area. The lobby circulation is a transition space that leads the direction, allows a sequential experience along the passage and could even become something in its own right. Sometimes, the passage where the required practical functions are simpler than other kind of spaces also allows opportunities to implant a site-specific installation integral to the space along the way.

    00 Lobby

    GPI: What were your functional and conceptual goals for the lobby?

    Sirichayaporn: The ceiling plane was our main focus, developing a design that would implement circulation. The architectural intervention to the entire ceiling plane, with its dynamic wave lines, leads the movement of the visitors towards the seafront beyond. The fabric installation on the ceiling becomes a main feature in the space while simple elements on the ground provide a tranquil atmosphere.

    01 Lobby

    GPI: How did you use specific design tools (such as color, form, materiality, lighting) to create the space?

    Sirichayaporn: At night, strip lighting accents the form above highlighting the fabrics linear pattern. The whole ceiling volume becomes a gentle luminous source of light giving a fine ambient to the overall space. At the end of the lobby space, the bar area is arranged linearly along the building edge parallel to the sea with maximum opening to the ocean view. Backdrop of the bar area lies a wooden wall with alcoves where the daybeds partially tuck themselves into the wall. Oversized and soft furniture provides comfortable and relaxing seating for guests to sink into. A full-wall mirror at the end of the long space doubles the visual length of the bar area. Color tones are clean, subdued and tranquil keeping a relaxed atmosphere of the space.

    06 Lounge

    GPI: What was the biggest constraint in turning this design into a reality?

    Sirichayaporn: For various linkage spaces throughout the hotel, whether they are an elevator hall, a linkage from an elevator hall to restaurants, a connection to the retail area within the same building complex, or a connection from the parking lot to the hotel, the project had to bring all of their latent design opportunities to their best – as spaces to connect, to introduce and to invite people to take on their little journey to their destination.

    02 Lobby

    GPI: What makes this space impactful?

    Sirichayaporn: The visual elements in the space are what makes this space impactful. They are loose reminiscent of an underwater landscape – sea fan and translucent luminous ocean creatures. The interior surfaces are almost transformed from their original materiality into thin gorgonian membranes wrapping the space.  Clusters of glowing organic-shape lamps suspended randomly in mid-air with varying sizes and colors scatter throughout the space. These visual elements really creates the atmosphere of the Hilton Pattaya, as a resort overlooking the ocean.

    ______

    Many thanks to Thunchanok for sharing the inspiration for this lobby design. Stay tuned to our next Impactful Entry Space interview coming up in two weeks. For more visual inspiration, follow our Impactful Entry Space board on Pinterest.

    Image creditsDepartment of Architecture

  8. Impactful Entry Space: Hilton Pattaya

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    In this Impactful Entry Space blog series, we will feature a designer or artist that has created an attention-grabbing design for the main lobby space of a building. Drawing inspiration from completed entry spaces around the world, we travel beyond the image by diving into the design process and concepts behind it.

    Today, we feature our interview with Thunchanok Sirichayaporn of  Department of Architecture about the lobby design of Hilton Pattaya in Pattaya, Thailand.

    03 Lobby

    GPI Design: What did the lobby space mean to the building as a whole?

    Thunchanok Sirichayaporn: The space for the hotel lobby and bar occupies the 16th floor, high above the bustle of Pattaya beach below. Upon entering the space from one end, as elevator doors open, one would enter a spacious lobby area. The lobby circulation is a transition space that leads the direction, allows a sequential experience along the passage and could even become something in its own right. Sometimes, the passage where the required practical functions are simpler than other kind of spaces also allows opportunities to implant a site-specific installation integral to the space along the way.

    00 Lobby

    GPI: What were your functional and conceptual goals for the lobby?

    Sirichayaporn: The ceiling plane was our main focus, developing a design that would implement circulation. The architectural intervention to the entire ceiling plane, with its dynamic wave lines, leads the movement of the visitors towards the seafront beyond. The fabric installation on the ceiling becomes a main feature in the space while simple elements on the ground provide a tranquil atmosphere.

    01 Lobby

    GPI: How did you use specific design tools (such as color, form, materiality, lighting) to create the space?

    Sirichayaporn: At night, strip lighting accents the form above highlighting the fabrics linear pattern. The whole ceiling volume becomes a gentle luminous source of light giving a fine ambient to the overall space. At the end of the lobby space, the bar area is arranged linearly along the building edge parallel to the sea with maximum opening to the ocean view. Backdrop of the bar area lies a wooden wall with alcoves where the daybeds partially tuck themselves into the wall. Oversized and soft furniture provides comfortable and relaxing seating for guests to sink into. A full-wall mirror at the end of the long space doubles the visual length of the bar area. Color tones are clean, subdued and tranquil keeping a relaxed atmosphere of the space.

    06 Lounge

    GPI: What was the biggest constraint in turning this design into a reality?

    Sirichayaporn: For various linkage spaces throughout the hotel, whether they are an elevator hall, a linkage from an elevator hall to restaurants, a connection to the retail area within the same building complex, or a connection from the parking lot to the hotel, the project had to bring all of their latent design opportunities to their best – as spaces to connect, to introduce and to invite people to take on their little journey to their destination.

    02 Lobby

    GPI: What makes this space impactful?

    Sirichayaporn: The visual elements in the space are what makes this space impactful. They are loose reminiscent of an underwater landscape – sea fan and translucent luminous ocean creatures. The interior surfaces are almost transformed from their original materiality into thin gorgonian membranes wrapping the space.  Clusters of glowing organic-shape lamps suspended randomly in mid-air with varying sizes and colors scatter throughout the space. These visual elements really creates the atmosphere of the Hilton Pattaya, as a resort overlooking the ocean.

    ______

    Many thanks to Thunchanok for sharing the inspiration for this lobby design. Stay tuned to our next Impactful Entry Space interview coming up in two weeks. For more visual inspiration, follow our Impactful Entry Space board on Pinterest.

  9. Thursday Salute to Originals: Not Michelangelo’s Kind of Mural

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    Europe has no shortage of stunning churches and chapels. With massive vaulted ceilings, meticulous architectural details, and incredibly intricate life-like murals adorning the walls and ceilings, it’s no wonder these buildings draw admirers from all over the world. But as if there wasn’t already enough reason to look up, one artist has used technology to give these antiquated beauties a psychedelic facelift that is sure to have you tilting your head towards the ceiling.

    miguel-chevalier-light-mesh-installation-green-cathedral-england

    Artist Miguel Chevalier has created a vivid and ever-changing “mural” on the vaulted ceiling of the Durham Cathedral in England. Using virtual interweaving meshes of projected light, the vaulted ceiling becomes a canvas for a dazzling morphing and twisting light show triggered by programming cues and visitor movement. (No, this certainly is not Michelangelo’s kind of fresco!).

    chevalier-durham-cathedral-england-blue-red-light-mesh

    The ceiling looks alive as the webs form, deform, and then reform again. Perception of the architecture and the space are distorted as the structure seemingly ripples in tandem with the shifting colors, shapes, and sizes of the light waves.

    miguel-chevalier-mesh-light-installation-durham-cathedral-blue-green

    The still images are quite captivating in their own right. But watch the video and you’ll be fully entranced in the psychedelic morphing of these vibrant meshes of light.

    Though very different from traditional murals like that of the Sistine Chapel, Chevalier’s light paintings prove that modern technology can intrigue, complement, and enhance architecture just as beautifully as antiquated art. And that alone deserves our Thursday Salute! Though it’s clearly way beyond his time, we can’t help but hypothesize how different the Sistine Chapel may have been if Michelangelo worked with light as his medium instead of paint.

    Image Credits: designboom

  10. Impactful Entry Space: The Polin Museum

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    In this Impactful Entry Space blog series, we will feature a designer or artist that has created an attention-grabbing design for the main lobby space of a building. Drawing inspiration from completed entry spaces around the world, we travel beyond the image by diving into the design process and concepts behind it.

    Today, we feature our interview with Rainer Mahlamaki of  Lahdelma & Mahlamaki Architects about the lobby design of The Polin Museum in Warsaw, Poland.

    The_Museum_of_the_History_of_Polish_Jews_01

    GPI Design: What did the lobby space mean to the building as a whole?

    Rainer Mahlamaki: The main space of the museum is the Core Exhibition area, but that has nothing to do with architecture: It is a black box – it is difficult to create any architecture about that. So, creating the lobby was actually a strategic choice: I wanted to create a space the people will remember after their visit besides the exhibition.

    The_Museum_of_the_History_of_Polish_Jews_03

    GPI: What were your functional and conceptual goals for the lobby?

    Mahlamaki: The goal was to give the building a restrained wow effect and that the visitors will have a certain feeling before they enter the exhibition and also afterwards. The lobby is simple and elegant – a space for to compose one’s self.

    The_Museum_of_the_History_of_Polish_Jews_05

    GPI: How did you use specific design tools (such as color, form, materiality, lighting) to create the space?

    Mahlamaki: The color, the form, the lighting, the materiality are all connected with each other. During the time of a day/year it all acts in a varying way. The form is not geometric, it is 3-dimensionally curving freely – the restrictions of the structure (bearing structure) had its own limits.

    Polish Museum

    GPI: What was the biggest constraint in turning this design into a reality?

    Mahlamaki: The bearing structure was technically difficult; it was to give a firm and solid impression – and to have a spiritual connection with the theme of the museum.

    The_Museum_of_the_History_of_Polish_Jews_02

    GPI: What makes this space impactful?

    Mahlamaki: The space is impactful for the reason that such free form spaces sparsely exist. There are some but their geometry is not based on rectangle form. The museum has strong identity, it is iconic. It is not enough for a museum about Jewish history in Europe to have good architecture – it has to be also impressive.

    ______

    Many thanks to Rainer for sharing the inspiration for this lobby design. Stay tuned to our next Impactful Entry Space interview coming up in two weeks. For more visual inspiration, follow our Impactful Entry Space board on Pinterest.

     

    Image Credits: archdailystrangelinepublicseminararchitecturelabphotoroomconstructalia